Category Archives: Mobile

Encrypt your mobile devices.

Encrypt your mobile devices.

(Photo from – http://www.androidauthority.com/how-to-encrypt-android-device-326700/)

Encrypting important files on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device will ensure that if the device is compromised, the hacker won’t be able to read these important files.

  • To encrypt your files on Mac visit: http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/encrypt-mac-folder/
    • This site will walk you through the process of encrypting your files.
  • An alternative to encrypting your mobile device would be to keep all personal information off of the device.
    • Limiting the amount of confidential information on your cellphone can greatly reduce the risk of being compromised if the device is lost or stolen.

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

 

 

Strong passwords (or phrases) can keep you safe.

Strong passwords (or phrases) can keep you safe.

(Photo from – https://thehackernews.com/2016/07/best-password-manager.html)

Many of us have taken cyber security trainings that encourage us to use special characters such as the @ symbol for an “a” or $ for an “S”, however cyber-criminals have developed technology that can help them crack passwords that use these tactics.

  • Consider a passphrase instead.
    • Passphrases are a series of unrelated words that are being used in place of our traditional passwords ( 8 characters 1 capital and special character).
    • For your passphrase to be strong and secure be sure to use at least 4 unrelated words.
    • ILoveYorkiePuppies can still be cracked if the cyber-criminal has done their homework.
  • Too many passwords, and not enough memory?
    • Consider using a reputable password manager.
    • These services allow you to store your information for several sites securely
    • There are several options available, as with any software there are free and paid versions available.
    • Do your homework and find one youll feel confident using.
  • A few highly rated free versions include:

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

Backup all of your devices, and do it often!

Backup all of your devices, and do it often!

(Photo from – https://www.fusionspan.com/backup-disaster-recovery-small-office/)

Backing up your files can help you if you are ever a victim of a cyber-crime.

  • Regular backups can help
    • Recover files that may have been ransomed or corrupted
    • Allow you to do a full wipe of a defected device
    • Ensure even in an accident ( such as water damage) your important files are safe to be recovered
    • Keep your device running smoothly
    • If you are doing regular backups you can go through and update important files and delete those you no longer need, therefore freeing up space and allowing your device to run effectively.
  • There’s more than one way to backup your important files
    • Create a backup or system image directly on the device.
    • Use reliable cloud storage.
    • Consider a portable device.
    • USB Flash Drives can be useful.
    • Consider the amount of data you are backing up and if it needs to be encrypted or not
    • Many options and sizes are available to meet your needs.
    • Ideal if you do not have a need to store a large amount of files.
    • USB’s can be easy to loose, consider password protection.
    • Remember the smaller the USB drive (in physical size not GB) the slower it maybe.
    • Portable External Hard Drives.
    • Have recently become more affordable
    • Also come in many different sizes, colors, and styles to meet your needs
    • Can be password protected and encrypted as well.
    • Would be ideal if you have a need to store a large amount of files as many being at 1TB

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

Keep your mobile device safe!

Keep your mobile device safe!

(Photo from – https://www.thompsoncoburn.com/insights/blogs/cybersecurity-bits-and-bytes/post/2016-09-28/the-serious-security-vulnerabilities-of-mobile-devices)

  • Don’t think you’re device is safe from cyber-attacks or criminals.
    • Mobile devices are just as susceptible to the same types of attacks.
    • Including malware and phishing.
  • Use the same security on your mobile device as you would your personal or business computer.
    • Use a strong password
    • Passphrases are strong and hard to crack, use 4 or more unrelated words to create a difficult password for your device.
    • Such as PumpkinMovieCarStar
    • Alternate the letters you capitalize for additional protection, or add a special character as well.
    • It may take longer to log in, but it will ensure your device is secure
  • If you have a newer mobile device fingerprint recognition as well as facial recognition may be available.
    • Using these options allow you to unlock your device quickly, while ensuring it can’t be accessed by another party.
    • When using fingerprint recognition remember it allows you to store more than one print. Consider using one finger on each hand for ease of use.
  • If it connects to the internet, it should be protected.
    • Tablets, iPads, and net books can also be compromised.
    • Password protect these devices, encrypt important data on them
    • Do not save your user names and passwords on them.
    • Consider a password management system
    • Do not download applications from untrusted sites.
  • If your device has been compromised contact Fordham IT.
    • Contact Fordham IT and provide them as much information as you can.
    • Fordham IT will work with public safety and local law enforcement to help you attempt to recover your files and protect you from future attacks.

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu.

 

Beware of This Apple iPhone Password Phishing Scam

ios security phishing

Apple’s iPhone customers could potentially fall victim to a scam that would see them unwittingly hand over their Apple ID credentials.

Security researcher Felix Krause on Tuesday published a proof-of-concept that shows how easy it is for hackers to replicate the familiar “Sign In to iTunes Store” Apple prompt on the iPhone and steal a user’s password. According to Krause, developers can turn on an alert inside their apps that look identical to the legitimate pop-up requesting a user’s credentials. If the person inputs the password, the malicious app owner could steal the information and users wouldn’t even know they were targeted.

“Users are trained to just enter their Apple ID password whenever iOS prompts you to do so,” Krause wrote in a blog post. “However, those popups are not only shown on the lock screen, and the home screen, but also inside random apps, e.g. when they want to access iCloud, GameCenter or In-App-Purchases. This could easily be abused by any app.”

Apple ID alerts are common fare in a typical day using the iPhone. They come up when users want to make an app purchase or when account content, like iCloud data, needs to be accessed. Apple’s legitimate pop-ups display information and then request users input their Apple ID passwords to proceed.

According to Krause, any app developer can create an identical pop-up, and he was able to do just that as part of his research. Users, then, would be hard-pressed to determine whether it was a legitimate password request or one that could leave their credentials open for theft.

Still, Krause said that users can protect themselves by never inputting passwords into pop-ups and instead going into the iPhone’s Settings menu and do it there to ensure it’s a legitimate request. He also suggests clicking the home button when a pop-up is displayed. If the home button closes the app, it was a phishing scam, but if the pop-up remains, it’s a real Apple request.

Looking ahead, Krause believes the best way to fix the problem is by Apple making some tweaks to the way apps ask for Apple ID passwords. Rather than use pop-ups, he says, Apple should ask users to open the Settings app and input their credentials there, thereby eliminating the apps from the process altogether.

(source: http://fortune.com/2017/10/10/apple-iphone-password-phishing-scam/)

Article: Random text? Wait, wait, don’t click that!

“Here’s a tip that’s worth repeating:

Don’t click on a link in a text message you get on your phone that says you’ve won a terrific prize or a gift card, or that asks you to click on a link. Don’t reply either. It’s probably a scam.

The Federal Trade Commission settled charges with a group of marketers that were part of a scheme that sent millions of unsolicited spam text messages promoting supposedly free merchandise like $1,000 gift cards for Wal-Mart and Best Buy.

People who clicked the links in the messages didn’t get the promised prizes. Instead, they were taken to websites that asked them to give personal information and sign up for multiple offers, often involving purchases or paid subscriptions.

What can you do about unwanted text messages?

  • Delete unwanted text messages that ask you to enter a special code, or to confirm or provide personal information. Legitimate companies won’t send you a text asking for sensitive information.
  • Don’t click on links in the text message. Links can take you to spoof sites that look real but will steal your personal information.
  • Report spam texts to your carrier. Copy the original message and forward it to 7726 (SPAM) free of charge, if you are an AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, or Sprint subscriber.”

Though scams involving free gift cards and merchandise are common there are also other types of scams prevalent via text messages. Below is an example of  a scam text message.

textscam

Source: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/random-text-wait-wait-dont-click