Category Archives: Identity and Access Management

Strong passwords (or phrases) can keep you safe.

Strong passwords (or phrases) can keep you safe.

(Photo from – https://thehackernews.com/2016/07/best-password-manager.html)

Many of us have taken cyber security trainings that encourage us to use special characters such as the @ symbol for an “a” or $ for an “S”, however cyber-criminals have developed technology that can help them crack passwords that use these tactics.

  • Consider a passphrase instead.
    • Passphrases are a series of unrelated words that are being used in place of our traditional passwords ( 8 characters 1 capital and special character).
    • For your passphrase to be strong and secure be sure to use at least 4 unrelated words.
    • ILoveYorkiePuppies can still be cracked if the cyber-criminal has done their homework.
  • Too many passwords, and not enough memory?
    • Consider using a reputable password manager.
    • These services allow you to store your information for several sites securely
    • There are several options available, as with any software there are free and paid versions available.
    • Do your homework and find one youll feel confident using.
  • A few highly rated free versions include:

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

Keep your mobile device safe!

Keep your mobile device safe!

(Photo from – https://www.thompsoncoburn.com/insights/blogs/cybersecurity-bits-and-bytes/post/2016-09-28/the-serious-security-vulnerabilities-of-mobile-devices)

  • Don’t think you’re device is safe from cyber-attacks or criminals.
    • Mobile devices are just as susceptible to the same types of attacks.
    • Including malware and phishing.
  • Use the same security on your mobile device as you would your personal or business computer.
    • Use a strong password
    • Passphrases are strong and hard to crack, use 4 or more unrelated words to create a difficult password for your device.
    • Such as PumpkinMovieCarStar
    • Alternate the letters you capitalize for additional protection, or add a special character as well.
    • It may take longer to log in, but it will ensure your device is secure
  • If you have a newer mobile device fingerprint recognition as well as facial recognition may be available.
    • Using these options allow you to unlock your device quickly, while ensuring it can’t be accessed by another party.
    • When using fingerprint recognition remember it allows you to store more than one print. Consider using one finger on each hand for ease of use.
  • If it connects to the internet, it should be protected.
    • Tablets, iPads, and net books can also be compromised.
    • Password protect these devices, encrypt important data on them
    • Do not save your user names and passwords on them.
    • Consider a password management system
    • Do not download applications from untrusted sites.
  • If your device has been compromised contact Fordham IT.
    • Contact Fordham IT and provide them as much information as you can.
    • Fordham IT will work with public safety and local law enforcement to help you attempt to recover your files and protect you from future attacks.

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu.

 

Multifactor Authentication Enrollment

Tip #3 | Don’t Share THAT about Yourself Online!

Shakespeare Listens

Image: Kelli Marshall, Locating Shakespeare in the 21st Century, Vimeo

Inappropriate sharing of secrets always makes for a good plot twist in a Shakespearean play:

O negligence!
Fit for a fool to fall by: what cross devil
Made me put this main secret in the packet
I sent the king? Is there no way to cure this?
No new device to beat this from his brains?
(Henry VIII, Act 3.2)

When you meet someone new, whether it’s in your residence hall, at a party, or at work, do you immediately tell that person your full name, social security number, phone number, address, credit card and bank account numbers? Didn’t think so. You wouldn’t share most of that information with a good friend, either.

But what if you were asked, politely, a few times for the information? And what if the request came with a promise not to share any of your personal information, including your funny middle name, with anyone else? Right. Didn’t think so.

You should feel the same way about your privacy when a social media site asks you for that information. If you need to share those personal details to join the site, that’s a red flag. Walk (or surf) away from it, fast.

When you share something that’s personally identifiable with the wrong person or website, it will be quite difficult to find a “cure” and “beat” it out of his or her “brains” or database!

Read more about Cyber Security Awareness Month!