Critical macOS High Sierra Update

Apple has released a security update resolving the widely reported authentication bug known as iAmRoot. The UISO recommends that Apple computers running High Sierra (macOS 10.13.x) install this security update.

Due to its critical nature, Apple has deployed this as an automatically-installing update. However, it is still recommended to check for this and any other pending security updates.

The process to update is:

  • Click the  logo in the Taskbar
  • Click App Store
  • Click Updates
  • Install any security related updates shown
    • The recommended patch is Security Update 2017-001

Please do not hesitate to to contact infosec@fordham.edu with any questions.

Sources:

US-Cert: Apple Releases Security Update for macOS High Sierra

New security update fixes macOS root bug

Holiday Shopping 2017: How to avoid fake retail sites and other scams

Via: USAToday.com

1) Stop chasing any and all deals

“We live in an age where we have all these push notifications and emails,” said Steve Koenig, senior director of market research at the Consumer Technology Association, a trade group in Arlington, Va.

The volume of such activity during the holidays, he said, only makes consumers even more vulnerable to clicking on a $100 coupon before thinking twice.

“We’re all moving super fast, we get distracted,” said Tim Helming, director of product management at DomainTools.

When we’re rushing, we might not notice that the website in an email has an odd name.

Brands that continue to be spoofed include Amazon,Walmartand Target. Other brands that are commonly targeted include PayPal, Yahoo and Apple.

Helming told me that consumers need to be wary of fake sites that play up the “Black Friday” frenzy. Dozens of malicious domain registrations that touted a Black Friday connection cropped up last year beginning around Nov. 20, and he’d expect the same this year, too.

2) Learn how to spot a fake

Watch out for a domain decorated with a few extra, possibly even reassuring words or odd spellings. DomainTools listed some brand-abusing domains that have a dot-com at the end but they’re still frauds, such as Amazonsecure-shop, Target-officialsite or  Walmartkt.

Other fakes include: Amazonshop.gq or Targethome.today or Walmart-outlet.ga.

Helming said domains that include a hyphen and words such as shop or secure can be good clues to a phony site, as many brand names use their names alone for their sites.

Other words in a fake URL site that appears to be connected to a well-known name might be something like outlet, discounts or deals.

Many times, the fraudsters use words like “official site” to make their fake sites look legitimate. Or there might be extra letters, such as “Yahooo” or “Walmaart.”

Take care on social media. Phishers can use of “URL shortening” services to obfuscate phishing URLs. As a result a very short URL, can be used in Tweets, which automatically redirect the visitor to a longer “hidden” URL, according to the Anti-Phishing Working Group’s research.

3) Recognize the risks of rushing

Consumers who click on the links or visit malicious sites are typically unknowingly handing over their name, address, and credit card information.

Never click on links in emails or social media to go to a retailer’s website. A better bet: Take a few extra seconds to go directly to the site yourself. Be sure to take a second look at all URLs.

4) Ask yourself why would Amazon be sending you a free gift card? Really?

Yes, one of those free $50 Amazon gift cards popped up in my email the other day. Of course, it’s a spoofed email. So I just hit delete.

Amazon is warning consumers that phishing emails will direct you to a “false website that looks similar to the Amazon website, where you might be asked to provide account information such as your e-mail address and password combination.”

The fake sites can steal sensitive information that can be used without your knowledge to commit fraud, according to Amazon.

Phishers can steal usernames and passwords from one site to engage in fraud on other sites. Too many consumers carelessly use the exact same usernames and passwords across different sites.

Amazon doesn’t send emails that ask for your Social Security number, bank account information, PIN, or your Amazon.com password.

Amazon offers shoppers a way to report suspicious emails and web pages. You can forward the email or send suspicious e-mail as an attachment to stop-spoofing@amazon.com.

More: Are 2017’s Black Friday deals really as amazing as retailers claim?

More: How to find hard-to-get, out-of-stock gifts without getting ripped off

5) As you order gifts online, don’t get tripped up by fake email alerts

As holiday shipping goes up in November and December, the frequency of phishing emails relating to orders or shipments goes up, too.

Walmart warns that if you received an order confirmation email from Walmart but never placed such an order, it may be a “phishing scam attempting to gather information, or in some cases, spread malware.”

FedEx warns consumers about a  “delivery failure” scam email.

Fraudulent emails claiming to be from FedEx or the U.S. Postal Service “regarding a package that could not be delivered.”

The consumer is then asked to open an attachment in order to obtain the invoice needed to pick up their package. The attachment in the email may contain a virus.

Don’t just rush and assume there’s trouble with something that you ordered.

“Be suspicious of incoming email from unknown or unsolicited sources, especially those that have attachments as well as hyperlinks,” said Jeremy Stempien, detective for the City of Novi, Mich., and a special federal deputy marshal for the Southeast Michigan Financial Crimes Task Force.

“The same should apply to incoming phone calls,” he said.

6) Every deal you find online is not a bargain

Con artists tempt consumers with great deals on hard-to-find items or hot gifts. Maybe you’ll spot some extraordinary deal on an Apple iPhone X or find a crazy bargain price on an L.O.L. Surprise! Big Surprise toy.

Or you think you’ve found a great deal on jewelry. The Better Business Bureau and others warned in 2017, for example, about fake sites that offer up to 70% off on Pandora charms.

Charisse Ford, chief marketing officer for Pandora Americas, said shoppers should be aware that counterfeit sites have some clear indicators, including the “About Us” page that can be very generic without descriptions about the business, company mission or current Pandora images or promotions.

Another clue: Try calling and talking with someone in customer service first before placing an order to ask about return policies or the like. Shoppers are less likely to connect with a real person if going through a fraudulent site.

Companies such as Pandora note that they work hard to help identify and shut down counterfeit sites, including those on social media channels.

Con artists use phony websites to sell counterfeit goods — or engage in cybercrime.

It’s no bargain if, when you click on the link, you download malware.

“You think you are getting the discount of a lifetime or an exclusive offer, but this is a phishing attack,” warned Adam Levin, author of Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers and Identity Thieves.

Remember, bargains abound throughout the holiday season — so there’s no reason to think you absolutely must get all that shopping done right now.

 

Source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/tompor/2017/11/17/fake-amazon-gift-cards-phony-walmart-sites-and-other-cyber-scams-tempt-holiday-shoppers/862083001/

New Email Scam Using Fake Netflix Website

Via: mailguard.com.au

A scam email has appeared today that is pretending to be from Netflix. MailGuard detected the new scam early this morning, and stopped the malicious emails from entering our client’s inboxes.

This scam email is relatively well designed. The scammers are using a template system to generate individualised messages with specific recipient data.

This works like a mail-merge; the body of the email is generic, but the sender field is designed to show the name of the intended victim, which personalises the scam making it more convincing.

In this case the scammer’s system has not worked as well as they hoped and in the example below – screen-captured by our operations team – you can see that the ‘recipient’ field in the email has not been merged successfully. Instead of the victim’s name, it shows the placeholder instead:

 

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 11.23.26-1.png

Aside from the error with the recipient name field, this email looks quite convincing. The message tells the intended victim that their Netflix billing information has been invalidated and urges them to update their details on the website. If the recipient clicks the link in the email they are taken to a fake Netflix page, that asks them to log in and then enter their personal information, including credit card details.

Of course, this website is completely bogus and is just a mechanism for the scammers to steal the victim’s identity and credit card information.

The fake Netflix site this scam is using is built on a compromised WordPress blog. Scammers can break into WordPress sites by making use of vulnerabilities in blog plugins and once in, they can make the website look enough like a real Netflix login page to trick their victims – as shown in the screenshot above.

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 11.24.52.png

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 11.25.22.png

With the detailed data the fake website form asks for: address; credit card details; driver’s license; mother’s maiden name; etc, the scammers could potentially execute an identity theft and gain access to the victim’s bank accounts as well as their credit cards.

Once the fake website has collected all the sensitive data the scammers want, the victim is shown a reassuring ‘reactivation’ screen.

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 11.26.15.png

If you receive an email from Netflix today, ‘Chill,’ but don’t click without thinking first. Scammers can make their fake emails and bogus websites look pretty convincing, so it’s always a good idea to check carefully that the email comes from the actual company domain and not a scammer.

Think Before You Click:

– Always hover your mouse over links within emails and check the domain they’re pointing to. If they look suspicious or unfamiliar don’t open them.

– Cybersecurity threats take many different forms from simple spyware downloads to sophisticated ransomware attacks. Your business can be exposed to a wide variety of different vectors: through peripherals; USB devices; networks; attachments; etc. Security best practice recommends a layered defence strategy to protect users against web threats and malware.

Steps you can take to keep your mobile device safe.

Steps you can take to keep your mobile device safe.

 

(Photo from – https://www.mywot.com/en/blog/6-safe-web-surfing-tips)

Taking precautions on a regular basis can reduce the risk your home or mobile devices will be comprised. There are a few setting options you can enable that will allow you to surf and shop online securely.

  • Did you know aside from locking your mobile device, you may also be able to lock the applications as well.
    • Some applications have the option to be locked separately. Check within the applications settings for options.
    • Android users can also download an app that will allow them to lock additional applications that may not have that option built in.
    • IOS doesn’t offer additional applications with this option, however many apps are offering the option to use fingerprint recognition.
  • If you’re done updating your status, tracking your shipping, and double tapping cat pictures, log out.
    • It may make things easy for you to stay logged into your accounts on your mobile device, but it also makes it easier to compromise your device.
    • If you employ a password manager you don’t have to worry about saving your log in credentials on each app, this way if your device is compromised your accounts won’t be.
  • Android users have the option of installing additional antivirus to their mobile devices
  • Don’t jailbreak your device.
    • The steps you have to take to allow your device to be jailbroken leaves it vulnerable to attacks, by disabling built in security.
  • Avoid public networks when you can.
    • While free wifi is very appealing, using public networks can make you vulnerable to attack.
  • Take advantage of device location offered through your cell or OS provider

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu.

Encrypt your mobile devices.

Encrypt your mobile devices.

(Photo from – http://www.androidauthority.com/how-to-encrypt-android-device-326700/)

Encrypting important files on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device will ensure that if the device is compromised, the hacker won’t be able to read these important files.

  • To encrypt your files on Mac visit: http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/encrypt-mac-folder/
    • This site will walk you through the process of encrypting your files.
  • An alternative to encrypting your mobile device would be to keep all personal information off of the device.
    • Limiting the amount of confidential information on your cellphone can greatly reduce the risk of being compromised if the device is lost or stolen.

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

 

 

Strong passwords (or phrases) can keep you safe.

Strong passwords (or phrases) can keep you safe.

(Photo from – https://thehackernews.com/2016/07/best-password-manager.html)

Many of us have taken cyber security trainings that encourage us to use special characters such as the @ symbol for an “a” or $ for an “S”, however cyber-criminals have developed technology that can help them crack passwords that use these tactics.

  • Consider a passphrase instead.
    • Passphrases are a series of unrelated words that are being used in place of our traditional passwords ( 8 characters 1 capital and special character).
    • For your passphrase to be strong and secure be sure to use at least 4 unrelated words.
    • ILoveYorkiePuppies can still be cracked if the cyber-criminal has done their homework.
  • Too many passwords, and not enough memory?
    • Consider using a reputable password manager.
    • These services allow you to store your information for several sites securely
    • There are several options available, as with any software there are free and paid versions available.
    • Do your homework and find one youll feel confident using.
  • A few highly rated free versions include:

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

Backup all of your devices, and do it often!

Backup all of your devices, and do it often!

(Photo from – https://www.fusionspan.com/backup-disaster-recovery-small-office/)

Backing up your files can help you if you are ever a victim of a cyber-crime.

  • Regular backups can help
    • Recover files that may have been ransomed or corrupted
    • Allow you to do a full wipe of a defected device
    • Ensure even in an accident ( such as water damage) your important files are safe to be recovered
    • Keep your device running smoothly
    • If you are doing regular backups you can go through and update important files and delete those you no longer need, therefore freeing up space and allowing your device to run effectively.
  • There’s more than one way to backup your important files
    • Create a backup or system image directly on the device.
    • Use reliable cloud storage.
    • Consider a portable device.
    • USB Flash Drives can be useful.
    • Consider the amount of data you are backing up and if it needs to be encrypted or not
    • Many options and sizes are available to meet your needs.
    • Ideal if you do not have a need to store a large amount of files.
    • USB’s can be easy to loose, consider password protection.
    • Remember the smaller the USB drive (in physical size not GB) the slower it maybe.
    • Portable External Hard Drives.
    • Have recently become more affordable
    • Also come in many different sizes, colors, and styles to meet your needs
    • Can be password protected and encrypted as well.
    • Would be ideal if you have a need to store a large amount of files as many being at 1TB

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu

Keep your mobile device safe!

Keep your mobile device safe!

(Photo from – https://www.thompsoncoburn.com/insights/blogs/cybersecurity-bits-and-bytes/post/2016-09-28/the-serious-security-vulnerabilities-of-mobile-devices)

  • Don’t think you’re device is safe from cyber-attacks or criminals.
    • Mobile devices are just as susceptible to the same types of attacks.
    • Including malware and phishing.
  • Use the same security on your mobile device as you would your personal or business computer.
    • Use a strong password
    • Passphrases are strong and hard to crack, use 4 or more unrelated words to create a difficult password for your device.
    • Such as PumpkinMovieCarStar
    • Alternate the letters you capitalize for additional protection, or add a special character as well.
    • It may take longer to log in, but it will ensure your device is secure
  • If you have a newer mobile device fingerprint recognition as well as facial recognition may be available.
    • Using these options allow you to unlock your device quickly, while ensuring it can’t be accessed by another party.
    • When using fingerprint recognition remember it allows you to store more than one print. Consider using one finger on each hand for ease of use.
  • If it connects to the internet, it should be protected.
    • Tablets, iPads, and net books can also be compromised.
    • Password protect these devices, encrypt important data on them
    • Do not save your user names and passwords on them.
    • Consider a password management system
    • Do not download applications from untrusted sites.
  • If your device has been compromised contact Fordham IT.
    • Contact Fordham IT and provide them as much information as you can.
    • Fordham IT will work with public safety and local law enforcement to help you attempt to recover your files and protect you from future attacks.

Detailed information regarding device security and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you believe your device has been infected or compromised, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu.

 

Additional steps to say protected.

(Photo from – http://everhelperblog.com/new-nimbus-note-iphone-manual-note-encryption/ )

Ransomware, and malware like other types of cyber-attacks can be prevented with regular maintenance and vigilance. 

  • Back up your files
    • Set your system to do regular backups of your important information.
    • Don’t forget to back up your mobile devices as well. Including tablets, iPads, and cell phones.
  • Encrypt your files whenever you can
  • Be sure to patch and update all of your software.
    • Your software providers are constantly working to keep your OS and applications running smoothly, this includes patches to close up vulnerabilities.
  • If you suspect any suspicious activity, or believe you may have downloaded a malicious file.
    • Disconnect from the internet, this way no other devices are affected on the network.
    • Contact Fordham IT and provide them as much information as you can.
    • Fordham IT will work with public safety and local law enforcement to help you attempt to recover your files and protect you from future attacks.

Detailed information regarding Ransomware or Malware scams and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or via email to: HelpIT@fordham.edu.

 

Don’t pay the Ransom!

If you find that your device has been compromised, and a cyber-criminal is demanding a ransom to release the files or access to your device, DON’T PAY IT.

  • Payment does not guarantee the return of your files.
    • Many cyber-criminals that use ransomware also have their version of helpdesks, which will work with victims to try to convince them to pay the ransom.
    • In some instances they will even release some of the files in a show of “good faith”, yet this alone will not ensure you will get all of your files released, or that they won’t demand more money.
  • Paying the ransom will basically fund their next attack.
    • Often times the amount the cyber-criminals are requesting doesn’t seem as high as expected, however this is because realistically if a home computer is compromised and the requested ransom is $300.00 it’s more likely the victim can and will pay.
    • Funds they receive are used to increase their reach and power.
    • Cyber-criminals rely on their scare tactics to try to get victims to pay.
    • Requesting immediate action gives the user the feeling that they have a limited amount of time to comply with request, or even that they have a limited amount of time to recover their files.
    • Keep in mind that as the cyber-criminals grow with technology, so does law enforcement.
  • If your device has been compromised contact Fordham IT.
    • Contact Fordham IT and provide them as much information as you can.
    • Fordham IT will work with public safety and local law enforcement to help you attempt to recover your files and protect you from future attacks.
  • Remember that prevention is the best medicine for all things cyber security.
    • Use antivirus
    • Keep your OS and Antivirus up to date
    • Run regular scans
    • Don’t open suspicious emails (unfamiliar senders, special offers, unexpected request)
    • Don’t download suspicious attachments

Detailed information regarding Ransomware or Malware scams and other IT security topics are available on our IT Security website at: www.fordham.edu/SecureIT or from our blog at fordhamsecureit.blogspot.com

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact IT Customer Care at (718) 817-3999 or via email to: HelpIT@fordham.edu.