Category Archives: Alerts

Hurricane-Related Scams (Update)

via: US-CERT

As the peak of the 2017 hurricane season approaches, US-CERT warns users to be watchful for various malicious cyber activity targeting both disaster victims and potential donors. Users should exercise caution when handling emails that relate to recent hurricanes, even if those emails appear to originate from trusted sources. Disaster-related phishing emails may trick users into sharing sensitive information. Such emails could also contain links or attachments directing users to malware-infected websites. In addition, users should be wary of social media pleas, calls, texts, or door-to-door solicitations relating to the recent hurricanes.

To avoid becoming a victim of fraudulent activity, users and administrators should consider taking the following preventive measures:

Source: https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/current-activity/2017/09/08/Hurricane-Related-Scams

Alert: Online Scammers Require Payment Via Music Application Gift Cards

Via: IC3

Source: https://www.ic3.gov/media/2017/170801.aspx

“Wire Transfer” Scam Email Sent to the Fordham Community on July 5, 2017

This is a Scam email that has been reported. This message was
received on or about July 5, 2017. Please DO NOT respond to this message or anything that looks like it. You may disregard and delete this message. If you have any questions about the validity of this email please contact IT Customer Care at 718-817-3999 or via email: helpit@fordham.edu.
———————-———-——Begin Message ——–——————————

From: <CustomerService@interaudibank.com>
Date: July 5, 2017 at 10:51:32 AM EDT
To: <user@fordham.edu>
Subject:Wire Transfer

A wire request has been sent to Interaudi Bank on 07/05/17 at 08:13:59 AM to transfer 10000.00 to your account.
The confirmation ID for this request is ******.
Please do not respond to this confirmation. This is an unmonitored mailbox, and replies to this email cannot be read or responded to.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The information contained in this message is privileged and confidential and protected from disclosure.

If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for

delivering this message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination,

distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited.

If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to the message and deleting it from your computer.

Thank you.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

———————-———-——End of Message ——-———-———————

Alert: New DHL Phishing Emails Targeting Fordham Community

Please be advised that there are suspicious emails circulating that are targeting members of the Fordham Community. The email contains what appear to be images of package slips. However, the images redirect you to a malicious phishing site.

These are not legitimate emails and should be reported immediately.
Please remain diligent and avoid giving any personally identifiable information through email. Pay attention to the sender of the email and if something appears suspicious, contact the sender directly to verify the messages legitimacy. DO NOT respond via email. If direct contact with the sender is not possible, please contact ITCC for assistance.

The content of the email is as follows:

———- Start of Message ———-
From: DHL Service <baqader1407@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, Jun 27, 2017 at 9:50 AM
Subject: DHL delivery details ……
To:

Dear  Customer ,

Please find attached DHL AWB , pls printed and given to courier upon arrival .
Thanks

Best regards

DHL Expess Team

DHL receipt.pdf
—————End of Message—————-

 

Please remember that Fordham IT will NEVER ask you for your username and password or ask you to click any links to validate or verify your account or password. If you receive questionable or suspicious communications, contact IT Customer Care and allow the University Information Security Office (UISO) to validate the legitimacy of these communication attempts.

Alert: Suspicious E-Mails Targeting University Staff

Please be advised that there are suspicious emails circulating that are targeting University faculty and staff to include secretaries, assistants and receptionists. We have received reports of several different emails circulating requesting the recipient to reply.

These are not legitimate emails and should be reported immediately.
Please remain diligent and avoid giving any personally identifiable information through email. Pay attention to the sender of the email and if something appears suspicious, contact the sender directly to verify the messages legitimacy. DO NOT respond via email. If direct contact with the sender is not possible, please contact ITCC for assistance.

Please remember that Fordham IT will NEVER ask you for your username and password or ask you to click any links to validate or verify your account or password. If you receive questionable or suspicious communications, contact IT Customer Care and allow the University Information Security Office (UISO) to validate the legitimacy of these communication attempts.

Article: Apple fixes dozens of security bugs for iPhones, Macs.

Via: ZDNet

“Apple has squashed dozens of security bugs in its latest releases of its iPhone, iPad, and Mac operating systems.

The Cupertino, Calif.-based company rolled out 23 security fixes in iOS 10.3.2 and another 30 fixes in macOS 10.12.5, both of which were released on Monday.

Among the bugs, two bugs in iBooks for iOS could allow an attacker to arbitrarily open websites and execute malicious code at the kernel level. Over a dozen flaws were found in WebKit, which renders websites and pages on iPhones and iPads, that could allow several kinds of cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks.

A separate flaw in iBooks for macOS desktops and notebooks could allow an application to escape its secure sandbox, a technology used to prevent data loss or theft in the case of an app compromise.

Almost half of the bugs found were attributed to Google’s Project Zero, the search giant’s in-house vulnerability-finding and security team.

One of the iOS bugs credited to Synack security researcher Patrick Wardle described a kernel flaw in which a malicious application could read restricted memory, such as passwords or hashes.

In a blog post last month, Wardle explained how he found the zero-day flaw following a supposed fix in an earlier version of macOS 10.12. He said that Apple’s patch “did not fix the kernel panic” and worse, “introduced a kernel info leak, that could leak sensitive information” that could bypass the operating system’s security feature that randomizes the kernel’s memory address locations.

In an email, Wardle admitted he “didn’t realize it affected iOS too.”

Patches are available through the usual automatic update channels.”

Source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/apple-fixes-dozens-of-security-bugs-in-ios-10-3-2-macos-updates/?loc=newsletter_large_thumb_related&ftag=TREc64629f&bhid=22897651806331074555632548278564

Alert: Critical Microsoft Vulnerability

Description

Initial reports indicate the hacker or hacking group behind the WannaCry campaign is gaining access to enterprise servers either through Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) compromise or through the exploitation of a critical Windows SMB vulnerability. Microsoft released a security update for the MS17-010 vulnerability on March 14, 2017. Additionally, Microsoft released patches for Windows XP, Windows 8, and Windows Server 2003 operating systems on May 13, 2017. According to open sources, one possible infection vector is via phishing emails.

Impact

Ransomware not only targets home users; businesses can also become infected with ransomware, leading to negative consequences, including

  • temporary or permanent loss of sensitive or proprietary information,
  • disruption to regular operations,
  • financial losses incurred to restore systems and files, and
  • potential harm to an organization’s reputation.

Paying the ransom does not guarantee the encrypted files will be released; it only guarantees that the malicious actors receive the victim’s money, and in some cases, their banking information. In addition, decrypting files does not mean the malware infection itself has been removed.

Defending Against Ransomware Generally

Precautionary measures to mitigate ransomware threats include:

  • Ensure anti-virus software is up-to-date.
  • Implement a data back-up and recovery plan to maintain copies of sensitive or proprietary data in a separate and secure location. Backup copies of sensitive data should not be readily accessible from local networks.
  • Scrutinize links contained in e-mails, and do not open attachments included in unsolicited e-mails.
  • Only download software – especially free software – from sites you know and trust.
  • Enable automated patches for your operating system and Web browser.

Alert: Employment Scam Targeting College Students Remains Prevalent

Via: IC2

“College students across the United States continue to be targeted in a common employment scam. Scammers advertise phony job opportunities on college employment websites, and/or students receive e-mails on their school accounts recruiting them for fictitious positions. This “employment” results in a financial loss for participating students.

How the scam works:

  • Scammers post online job advertisements soliciting college students for administrative positions.
  • The student employee receives counterfeit checks in the mail or via e-mail and is instructed to deposit the checks into their personal checking account.
  • The scammer then directs the student to withdraw the funds from their checking account and send a portion, via wire transfer, to another individual. Often, the transfer of funds is to a “vendor”, purportedly for equipment, materials, or software necessary for the job.
  • Subsequently, the checks are confirmed to be fraudulent by the bank.

The following are some examples of the employment scam e-mails:

“You will need some materials/software and also a time tracker to commence your training and orientation and also you need the software to get started with work. The funds for the software will be provided for you by the company via check. Make sure you use them as instructed for the software and I will refer you to the vendor you are to purchase them from, okay.”

“I have forwarded your start-up progress report to the HR Dept. and they will be facilitating your start-up funds with which you will be getting your working equipment from vendors and getting started with training.”

“Enclosed is your first check. Please cash the check, take $300 out as your pay, and send the rest to the vendor for supplies.”

Consequences of participating in this scam:

  • The student’s bank account may be closed due to fraudulent activity and a report could be filed by the bank with a credit bureau or law enforcement agency.
  • The student is responsible for reimbursing the bank the amount of the counterfeit checks.
  • The scamming incident could adversely affect the student’s credit record.
  • The scammers often obtain personal information from the student while posing as their employer, leaving them vulnerable to identity theft.
  • Scammers seeking to acquire funds through fraudulent methods could potentially utilize the money to fund illicit criminal or terrorist activity.

Tips on how to protect yourself from this scam:

  • Never accept a job that requires depositing checks into your account or wiring portions to other individuals or accounts.
  • Many of the scammers who send these messages are not native English speakers. Look for poor use of the English language in e-mails such as incorrect grammar, capitalization, and tenses.
  • Forward suspicious e-mails to the college’s IT personnel and report to the FBI. Tell your friends to be on the lookout for the scam.”

Source: https://www.ic3.gov/media/2017/170118.aspx

Google provides explanation on recent Google Docs campaign

A Google spokesperson shared the following statement with TNW, noting that 0.1 percent of Gmail users were affected. That’s roughly 1 million users, though:

“We realize people are concerned about their Google accounts, and we’re now able to give a fuller explanation after further investigation. We have taken action to protect users against an email spam campaign impersonating Google Docs, which affected fewer than 0.1 percent of Gmail users. We protected users from this attack through a combination of automatic and manual actions, including removing the fake pages and applications, and pushing updates through Safe Browsing, Gmail, and other anti-abuse systems. We were able to stop the campaign within approximately one hour. While contact information was accessed and used by the campaign, our investigations show that no other data was exposed. There’s no further action users need to take regarding this event; users who want to review third party apps connected to their account can visit Google Security Checkup.”

Source: https://thenextweb.com/security/2017/05/03/massive-google-docs-phishing-attack-currently-sweeping-internet/#.tnw_G8nzqYyw

Article: Chrome and Firefox Phishing Attack Uses Domains Identical to Known Safe Sites

A phishing attack is when an attacker sends you an email that contains a link to a malicious website. You click on the link because it appears to be trusted. Merely visiting the website may infect your computer or you may be tricked into signing into the malicious site with credentials from a site you trust. The attacker then has access to your username, password and any other sensitive information they can trick you into providing.

This variant of a phishing attack uses unicode to register domains that look identical to real domains. These fake domains can be used in phishing attacks to fool users into signing into a fake website, thereby handing over their login credentials to an attacker.

This affects the current version of Chrome browser, which is version 57.0.2987 and the current version of Firefox, which is version 52.0.2. This does not affect Internet Explorer or Safari browsers.

As you can see both of these domains appear identical in the browser but they are completely different websites. One of them was registered by us, today. Our epic.com domain is actually the domain https://xn--e1awd7f.com/ but it appears in Chrome and Firefox as epic.com.

The real epic.com is a healthcare website. Using our unicode domain, we could clone the real epic.com website, then start emailing people and try to get them to sign into our fake healthcare website which would hand over their login credentials to us. We may then have full access to their healthcare records or other sensitive data.

We even managed to get an SSL certificate for our demonstration attack domain from LetsEncrypt. Getting the SSL certificate took us 5 minutes and it was free. By doing this we received the word ‘Secure’ next to our domain in Chrome and the little green lock symbol in Firefox.

How to fix this in Firefox:

In your firefox location bar, type ‘about:config’ without quotes.
Do a search for ‘punycode’ without quotes.
You should see a parameter titled: network.IDN_show_punycode
Change the value from false to true.
Now if you try to visit our demonstration site you should see:

Can I fix this if I use Chrome?

Currently we are not aware of a manual fix in Chrome for this. Chrome have already released a fix in their ‘Canary’ release, which is their test release. This should be released to the general public within the next few days.

Until then, if you are unsure if you are on a real site and are about to enter sensitive information, you can copy the URL in the location bar and paste it into Notepad or TextEdit on Mac. It should appear as the https://xn--….. version if it is a fake domain. Otherwise it will appear as the real domain in its unencoded form if it is the real thing.

Source: https://www.wordfence.com/blog/2017/04/chrome-firefox-unicode-phishing/