Tip #14 First It Was Phishing, Now It’s Smishing

Example of a phishing text and how the consumer handled it using Twitter.

Example of a phishing text and how the consumer handled it using Twitter.

On another (very important) note, another phishing technique lures consumers by using text messages containing URLs and phone numbers. Such a message  usually asks for one’s immediate attention, and requires one to respond or click on the URL.

Oftentimes, the message will come from a “5000” number instead of an actual phone number. This indicates the text message was sent via email to one’s cell phone, rather than from another cell phone.

So don’t turn into another stolen cell phone statistic. Or a consumer who’s been tricked. Regardless of what you’re doing, make sure your cell phone is secure and keep an eye out for odd, seemingly “phishy” text messages.

If you think you’ve received a phishing message, contact IT Customer Care immediately: 718-817-3999 or HelpIT@fordham.edu.

Read more about cell phone safety in Tip #11.

 

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